Seat belt precautions

WARNING

All occupants of the vehicle must wear their seat belts at all times. Seat belts and child restraints reduce the risk of serious or fatal injuries for all occupants in the event of a collision or sudden stop. Without a seat belt, occupants could be shifted too close to a deploying air bag, strike the interior structure or be thrown from the vehicle. Properly worn seat belts greatly reduce these hazards.

Even with advanced air bags, unbelted occupants can be severely injured by a deploying air bag.

Always follow the precautions about seat belts, air bags and occupant seating contained in this manual.

Infant or small child

All 50 states have child restraint laws.You should be aware of the specific requirements in your state. Child and/or infant seats must be properly placed and installed in the rear seat. For more information about the use of these restraints, refer to Child restraint system in this section.

WARNING

Every person in your vehicle needs to be properly restrained at all times, including infants and children. Never hold a child in your arms or lap when riding in a vehicle. The violent forces created during a crash will tear the child from your arms and throw the child against the interior. Always use a child restraint appropriate for your child's height and weight.

NOTICE

Small children are best protected from injury in an accident when properly restrained in the rear seat by a child restraint system that meets the requirements of the Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards. Before buying any child restraint system, make sure that it has a label certifying that it meets Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard 213. The restraint must be appropriate for your child's height and weight. Check the label on the child restraint for this information. Refer to Child restraint system in this section.

Larger children

Children who are too large for child restraint systems should always occupy the rear seat and use the available lap/shoulder belts. The lap portion should be fastened snug on the hips and as low as possible. Check belt fit periodically. A child's squirming could put the belt out of position. Children are afforded the most safety in the event of an accident when they are restrained by a proper restraint system in the rear seat. If a larger child (over age 12) must be seated in the front seat, the child should be securely restrained by the available lap/shoulder belt and the seat should be placed in the rearmost position. Children age 12 and under should be restrained securely in the rear seat. NEVER place a child age 12 and under in the front seat. NEVER place a rear facing child seat in the front seat of a vehicle.

If the shoulder belt portion slightly touches the childs neck or face, try placing the child closer to the center of the vehicle. If the shoulder belt still touches their face or neck they need to be returned to a child restraint system.

WARNING - Shoulder belts on small children

Never allow a shoulder belt to be in contact with a childs neck or face while the vehicle is in motion.

If seat belts are not properly worn and adjusted on children, there is a risk of death or serious injury.

Pregnant women

The use of a seat belt is recommended for pregnant women to lessen the chance of injury in an accident. When a seat belt is used, the lap belt portion should be placed as low and snugly as possible on the hips, not across the abdomen. For specific recommendations, consult a physician.

WARNING - Pregnant women

Pregnant women must never place the lap portion of the safety belt over the area of the abdomen where the unborn child is located or above the abdomen where the belt could seriously injure or even cause the death of the unborn child during an impact.

Injured person

A seat belt should be used when an injured person is being transported. When this is necessary, you should consult a physician for recommendations.

One person per belt

Two people (including children) should never attempt to use a single seat belt. This could increase the severity of injuries in case of an accident.

Do not lie down

To reduce the chance of injuries in the event of an accident and to achieve maximum effectiveness of the restraint system, all passengers should be sitting up and the front and rear seats should be in an upright position when the car is moving. A seat belt cannot provide proper protection if the person is lying down in the rear seat or if the front and rear seats are in a reclined position.

WARNING

Riding with a reclined seatback increases your chance of serious or fatal injuries in the event of a collision or sudden stop. The protection of your restraint system (seat belts and air bags) is greatly reduced by reclining your seat. Seat belts must be snug against your hips and chest to work properly. The more the seatback is reclined, the greater the chance that an occupant's hips will slide under the lap belt causing serious internal injuries or the occupant's neck could strike the shoulder belt. Drivers and passengers should always sit well back in their seats, properly belted, and with the seatbacks upright.

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