ADVANCED STANDARD SAFETY TECHNOLOGIES: PART OF HYUNDAI'S ASSURANCE COMMITMENT

The 2005 Tucson was the first Hyundai model to feature standard ESC (Electronic Stability Control) upon its launch in fall 2004. It was also the first vehicle under $20,000 with standard ESC and six airbags. The Tucson started Hyundai's approach to combining state-of-the-art safety and affordability and this approach lives on in the 2010 Hyundai Tucson. The Tucson is loaded with life-saving standard safety features including ESC with traction control, six airbags and active front head restraints. Its braking system features four-wheel disc brakes controlled by an advanced four-channel ABS with Brake Assist, providing maximum braking force when a panic stop is detected, and Electronic Brake-force Distribution (EBD) to optimize brake performance with uneven weight distribution.

ESC compares the driver's intended course with the vehicle's actual response. If needed, ESC then brakes individual front or rear wheels and/or reduces engine power to help correct understeer or oversteer. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) studies show SUVs equipped with ESC experience 67 percent fewer single-vehicle crashes, and 63 percent fewer single-vehicle fatalities. In addition, a study by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) found that ESC reduces the risk of all fatal collisions by 52 percent and the risk of fatal single-vehicle rollovers of SUVs by 80 percent.

The Hyundai Tucson is engineered to provide its passengers with multiple defensive safety layers. The steel unibody has integrated crumple zones and a high-tensile front sub-frame designed to work together to reduce the forces that typically reach the passenger compartment. Particular attention has been paid to increasing the stiffness of the front side members which have been enlarged and straightened. Also, the center pillars serve as the anchors of a new ring structure which improves overall side structure stiffness while also creating more room for the door armrest and seat. All four doors also have internal guard beams to protect passengers in a side-impact collision.

The entire body shell has been made stiffer and lighter thanks to its extensive use of ultra-high tensile strength steel, which comprises 68.9 percent of the shell compared to its predecessor's 57.3 percent. Also, the use of Tailor Welded Blanks (TWB) has been expanded on key structural members. TWB assemblies combine steels of different thickness and grades using a sophisticated laser welding and stamping process to achieve an optimal stiffness-to-weight ratio. TWBs reduce body weight while enhancing crash energy management. These safety systems are expected to earn the 2010 Tucson NHTSA's top five-star crash test rating for front and side impacts.

Hyundai Tucson's standard front-seat active head restraints help prevent whiplash by automatically reducing the space between a front occupant's head and the head restraint during certain rear collisions and are highly recommended by safety organizations such as the IIHS.

The Tucson's passenger restraint systems also help minimize injury. Three-point belts are provided at all five seating positions, and the front seatbelts have pretensioners and load limiters. There are two outboard rear Lower Anchors and Tethers for Children (LATCH) child-seat anchors.

Elongated flush-mounted headlamps not only add a strong sense of style but also feature projector beam lenses for improved night-time driving safety. Side mirror housings have been modified to reduce wind noise and also feature an integrated repeater lamp for improved visibility on the Limited trim.

A total of six airbags are positioned in the Hyundai Tucson's interior. Dual advanced frontal airbags are complemented by front seat-mounted side-impact airbags and roof-mounted side-curtain airbags with new rollover sensors that cover both the front and rear seat rows. The combination of side and curtain airbags, which help protect the head and body during side impacts, can reduce fatalities by more than 45 percent, according to the IIHS.

Hyundai Tucson also features a standard Tire Pressure Monitoring System (TPMS) which alerts drivers if one or more tires are under inflated.

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